Stories

Northern California is wine country, but there was a long history of apple orchards before vineyards came to dominate the landscape. Now, some locals are hoping their beloved Gravenstein apple and its cider can carve out a space in Sonoma County. Jennifer Cecil Moore tells the story.
Dr. Liz Baldwin is on a mission to make the tomato you get at the supermarket taste better. She tells Lynne Rossetto Kasper what makes them go bad and what you can look for to make sure you're getting the best one.
In Rachel Khoo's Kitchen Notebook, the author opens up her titular notebook to share ideas and recipes she's gathered while traveling the world. She shares some of them with The Splendid Table contributor Shauna Sever.
Mirra Fine and Daniel Klein, the filmmaker and chef duo behind the Perennial Plate, came up with an idea: Travel the world documenting how food figures in people's lives all around the globe, and instead of heading for famous restaurant kitchens, track down the people we rarely see.
Salt might not be the first thing you associate with Appalachia, but as Ronni Lundy tells Von Diaz, it's as intertwined with the region's history as coal.
Jekka McVicar, "The Queen of Herbs," talks with Lynne Rossetto Kasper about the history of sage and its modern uses.
Francis Lam demonstrates everything from the basics of chopping an onion to the all-day challenge of his "weapons-grade" ratatouille In this very entertaining video series.
A Stanford biochemist has created the Impossible Burger, a plant-based burger that has the aroma and texture of a cow-based patty. Bon Appétit's Kurt Soller sampled it, and he tells Francis Lam what he learned and how it tastes.
Osayi Endolyn tells guest host Francis Lam about her introduction to Hoppin' John, and how that connected her to both her personal history and to the influence of African cuisine on the food of the American South.
Chef Jacques Pépin talks with guest host Francis Lam about why roast chicken is so iconic for French chefs, the importance of technique, and what he cooks at home.
The Sporkful's Dan Pashman has started Other People's Food, a podcast that uses the universality of food to find common ground amid racial and cultural differences.
Artist Kiko Denzer teaches Lynne Rossetto Kasper about the craft of spoon-carving.
What should you be looking for when you're buying zucchini, and what should you do with it once you have it? Taste of Home's Mark Hagen tells Noelle Carter what to do and why you should think beyond another loaf of zucchini bread.
Author Anya Fernald on how a broken oven on Thanksgiving sparked her love of cooking, and how her time in Italy informs her methods for entertaining others.
Home Cooked: Essential Recipes for a New Way to Cook author Anya Fernald tells Russ Parsons how she got her unconventional start, her enthusiasm for "long cuts," and what you can do to take the stress out of hosting a dinner party.
Making ice cream and frozen yogurt requires skill, so much so that Penn State offers a course on the subject. Molly Birnbaum, executive editor of Cook's Science for America's Test Kitchen, attended, and shares what she learned with Sally Swift.
You're not likely to find a more visually creative cookbook than Robin Ha's Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes, in which she illustrates the recipes for her favorite Korean dishes.
Some are calling zhug the new Sriracha, but what is it? Serious Eats' J. Kenji Lopez-Alt answers that question for Lynne Rossetto Kasper, and advises you to get out your mortar and pestle.
Sabrina Ghayour cooks up simple, Middle Eastern-influenced dishes with a modern twist in her second cookbook, Sirocco. She tells Russ Parsons about the shortcuts she found to traditional Persian methods (despite some skeptical aunts) and the spices she relies on in her kitchen.
Polar explorer and adventurer Ann Bancroft's latest project is "Access Water," a world-spanning journey that looks to document the world's fresh water shortage.
The Wisconsin supper club is something so unique to its region of the U.S. that someone really needed to make a movie about it.
Chef and author Tyler Kord argues that vegetables are the equal of roast beef for sandwiches, makes the case for less-than-perfect ingredients, and asks you (yes, you) to reconsider that to-go bag.
You may not know it, but celery leaf is an herb. "Queen of Herbs" Jekka McVicar knows this, hence her title. She shares its history, and its potential for helping a common ailment, with Lynne Rossetto Kasper.
Every month, the Splendid Table helps listeners equip their kitchens and fill their pantries. This month, we're giving away five 61-piece Zwilling stemware sets.